quotes

The Best Quotations

www.best-quotations.com
 


My "other" sites:

Quotes by

William Shakespeare

1564-1616 ,  English poet & playwright
William ShakespeareEnglish poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.
His extant works consist of approximately 38 plays,154 sonnets, two long narrative poems.

65 quotes110 visits

Quotations

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in our philosophy.

—  Hamlet


Doubt that the sun doth move, doubt truth to be a liar, but never doubt I love.

—  Hamlet


There's an old saying that applies to me: you can't lose a game if you don't play the game.

—  Romeo & Juliet


So shaken as we are, so wan with care.

—  Henry IV-1


There live not three good men unhanged in England; and one of them is fat, and grows old.

the fat one was Falstaff

—  Henry IV-1


It would be argument for a week, laughter for a month, and a good jest for ever.

—  Henry IV-1


To be, or not to be: that is the question.

—  Hamlet


A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!

—  Richard III


Action is eloquence.

—  Coriolanus


All that glisters is not gold.

—  The Merchant of Venice


All the world 's a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts.

—  As You Like It


Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon ’em.

—  Twelfth Night


Beware the ides of March.

—  Julius Caesar


Brevity is the soul of wit.

—  Hamlet


But love is blind, and lovers cannot see.

—  The Merchant of Venice


But, for my own part, it was Greek to me.

—  Julius Caesar


Can one desire too much of a good thing?

—  As You Like It


Conscience is but a word that cowards use, devised at first to keep the strong in awe.

—  Julius Caesar


Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once.

—  Julius Caesar


Cry “Havoc,” and let slip the dogs of war.

—  Julius Caesar


Delays have dangerous ends.

—  Henry IV, p. I


For ever and a day.

—  As You Like It


For you and I are past our dancing days.

—  Romeo and Juliet


Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.

—  Hamlet


I am one who loved not wisely but too well.

—  Othello


I will speak daggers to her, but use none.

—  Hamlet


I would give all my fame for a pot of ale, and safety.

—  Henry V


If music be the food of love, play on.

—  Twelfth Night


If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?

—  The Merchant of Venice


Look like the innocent flower, but be the serpent under it.

—  Macbeth


Love all, trust a few, Do wrong to none.

—  All's Well That Ends Well


Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.

—  The Tempest


My words fly up, my thoughts remain below:
Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

—  Hamlet


Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.

—  Hamlet


Now is the winter of our discontent.

—  King Richard III


Of all base passions, fear is the most accursed.

—  Henry IV, p. I


Off with his head!

—  King Richard III


Our doubts are traitors, and make us lose the good we oft might win, by fearing to attempt.

—  Measure for Measure


Small things make base men proud.

—  Henry VI, p. II


Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.

—  Much Ado about Nothing


Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.

—  Measure for Measure


Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind.

—  Henry IV, p. III


The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

—  Julius Caesar


The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.

—  Henry VI, p. II


The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.

—  As You Like It


The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

—  Hamlet


The worst is not, So long as we can say, “This is the worst.” King Lear


    There 's daggers in men's smiles. Macbeth


      The worst is not, So long as we can say, “This is the worst.”

      —  King Lear


      There 's daggers in men's smiles.

      —  Macbeth


      There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.

      —  Hamlet


      True is it that we have seen better days.

      —  As You Like It


      Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

      —  Henry IV, p. II


      We are such stuff
      As dreams are made on, and our little life
      Is rounded with a sleep.

      —  The Tempest


      We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

      —  Hamlet


      What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.

      —  Romeo and Juliet


      When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions.

      —  Hamlet


      Why, then the world 's mine oyster.

      —  Merry Wives of Windsor


      Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.

      —  Julius Caesar


      God hath given you one face, and you make yourself another.

      —  Hamlet


      Love is heavy and light, bright and dark, hot and cold, sick and healthy, asleep and awake- it’s everything except what it is!

      —  Romeo and Juliet


      That you have such a February face,
      So full of frost, of storm and cloudiness?

      —  Much Ado About Nothing


      As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods.
      They kill us for their sport.

      —  King Lear


      Journeys end in lovers meeting.

      —  Twelfth Night


      Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
      Or close the wall with our English dead.

      —  Henry V










      

      comments









      Similar sources

       Philip Sidney

       John Dryden
















       
      Creative Commons License    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

      2017: Manolis Papathanassiou