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Quotes by

Henry David Thoreau

1817-1862 ,  American writer
Henry David ThoreauAmerican essayist, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian.
A leading transcendentalist, Thoreau is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Resistance to Civil Government (also known as Civil Disobedience).

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Quotations

The law will never make men free; it is men who have got to make the law free.


It is not enough to be industrious; so are the ants. What are you industrious about?


Aeschylus had a clear eye for the commonest things. His genius was only an enlarged common sense.


How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.


That man is richest whose pleasures are the cheapest.


The rich man is always sold to the institution which makes him rich.


It takes two to speak the truth — one to speak and another to hear.


The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.


Most of the luxuries, and many of the so-called comforts of life, are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind.


The greatest compliment that was ever paid me was when one asked me what I thought, and attended to my answer.


Every generation laughs at the old fashions, but follows religiously the new.


The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.


It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see.


Never look back unless you are planning to go that way.


What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?


The great art of life is how to turn the surplus life of the soul into life for the body.


They can do without architecture who have no olives nor wines in the cellar.


Be not simply good; be good for something.


Love must be as much a light as it is a flame.












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